Statement from ANS Executive Director/CEO Craig Piercy on DOE award for UAMPS' Carbon Free Power Project

October 16, 2020, 11:54AMPress Releases

As the voice of American nuclear professionals, ANS applauds the Department of Energy's decision to award UAMPS' Carbon Free Power Project $1.355 billion in cost-sharing funding. The award will accelerate the deployment of NuScale's small modular reactors in supplying carbon-free power and ensuring the reliability of power grids with growing amounts of intermittent renewable electricity.

This week marks the largest commitment by the DOE in decades to nuclear energy. Still subject to future appropriations, a total of $4.55 billion in cost-sharing awards have been approved for NuScale's SMR, TerraPower and GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy’s Natrium, and X-energy’s Xe-100 reactor designs.

U.S. nuclear engineers and professionals are ready to design, build, and operate these next-generation reactors. Their deployment will mean new jobs here in the U.S. and new market opportunities abroad, as countries decarbonize their economies and halt climate change.


Established in 1954, ANS is an international professional organization of engineers and scientists devoted to the peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology. Its more than 9,500 members represent government, academia, research laboratories, medical facilities, and private industry. ANS’s mission is to advance, foster, and spur the development and application of nuclear science, engineering, and technology to benefit society.


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