New NNSA website helps in nuclear safeguards reporting

November 5, 2020, 6:59AMNuclear News

The National Nuclear Security Administration has launched RAINS—the Reporting Assistant for International Nuclear Safeguards website—intended to assist users with the requirements surrounding international nuclear safeguards.

Nuclear safeguards are designed to verify that all nuclear material declared by a nation-state is not diverted for non-peaceful uses; detect any misuse of declared facilities or locations outside facilities; and detect any undeclared nuclear material or activities in the nation-state.

Purpose: The website was developed to help users such as facility operators and regulatory staff learn more about international safeguards agreements and determine which items and activities are reportable to the International Atomic Energy Agency.

The site allows users to select a Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement, an Additional Protocol, or a modified Small Quantities Protocol and determine whether or not it applies to their situation. A key feature is the ability to search for an item or activity, such as “uranium ore,” and then to receive recommendations on whether or not safeguards reporting is required and where to find the relevant text in the agreements.

The site also has a number of tabs where users can search for information based on industry type or fuel cycle stage, for example. There also is a frequently asked questions tab.

Quote: “RAINS is one more way for NNSA to work with international partners to build their capacity to effectively and efficiently implement safeguards,” said Brent Park, deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation. “Because RAINS is on a website platform, it allows NNSA to continue this collaboration despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic while travel and in-person meetings are not practical.”

NNSA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Energy.


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